2019 Retirement & Tax Numbers

Every year, the Internal Revenue Service announces cost-of-living adjustments that affect contribution limits for retirement plans and various tax deduction, exclusion, exemption, and threshold amounts. Here are a few of the key adjustments for 2019.

Employer retirement plans

  • Employees who participate in 401(k), 403(b), and most 457 plans can defer up to $19,000 in compensation in 2019 (up from $18,500 in 2018); employees age 50 and older can defer up to an additional $6,000 in 2019 (the same as in 2018).
  • Employees participating in a SIMPLE retirement plan can defer up to $13,000 in 2019 (up from $12,500 in 2018), and employees age 50 and older can defer up to an additional $3,000 in 2019 (the same as in 2018).

IRAs

The combined annual limit on contributions to traditional and Roth IRAs increased to $6,000 in 2019 (up from $5,500 in 2018), with individuals age 50 and older able to contribute an additional $1,000. For individuals who are covered by a workplace retirement plan, the deduction for contributions to a traditional IRA is phased out for the following modified adjusted gross income (AGI) ranges:

 

2018

2019

Single/head of household     

$63,000-$73,000

$64,000-$74,000

Married filing jointly 

$101,000-$121,000       

$103,000-$123,000

Married filing separately 

$0-$10,000

$0-$10,000

The 2019 phaseout range is $193,000 – $203,000 (up from $189,000 – $199,000 in 2018) when the individual making the IRA contribution is not covered by a workplace retirement plan but is filing jointly with a spouse who is covered.

The modified AGI phase-out ranges for individuals to make contributions to a Roth IRA are:

2018

2019

Single/head of household    

$120,000-$135,000     

$122,000-$137,000

Married filing jointly 

$189,000-$199,000

$193,000-$203,000

Married filing separately 

$0-$10,000

$0-$10,000

 

Estate and gift tax

  • The annual gift tax exclusion for 2019 is $15,000, the same as in 2018.
  • The gift and estate tax basic exclusion amount for 2019 is $11,400,000, up from $11,180,000 in 2018.

Kiddie tax

Under the kiddie tax rules, unearned income above $2,200 in 2019 (up from $2,100 in 2018) is taxed using the trust and estate income tax brackets. The kiddie tax rules apply to: (1) those under age 18, (2) those age 18 whose earned income doesn’t exceed one-half of their support, and (3) those ages 19 to 23 who are full-time students and whose earned income doesn’t exceed one-half of their support.

Standard Deduction

Single

$12,000     

$12,200

Head of Household

$18,000

$18,350

Married Filing Jointly

$24,000

$24,400

Married filing separately 

$12,000

$12,200

The additional standard deduction amount for the blind or aged (age 65 or older) in 2019 is $1,650 (up from $1,600 in 2018) for single/HOH or $1,300 (the same as in 2018) for all other filing statuses. Special rules apply if you can be claimed as a dependent by another taxpayer.

This material was prepared by Broadridge Investor Communication Solutions, Inc. This information is believed to be from reliable sources; however, no representation is made as to its accuracy or completeness. This information does not constitute tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty, nor is it a solicitation or recommendation to purchase or sell any insurance or investment product or service, and readers should not rely upon it as such. Readers should seek such advice from their own tax or legal counsel or financial professional. Securities, investment advisory and financial planning services through qualified registered representatives of MML Investors Services, LLC. Member SIPC www.SIPC.ORG . 6 Corporate Drive, Shelton, CT 06484. Tel: 203-513-6000.

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